ADOPTION

ADOPTION

Learn more about the different types of adoption.

There are five major types of adoptions: Independent or Private Adoption, Domestic Agency Adoption, International Adoption, Stepparent and Second Parent Adoption, and Adult Adoption. Follow the links to learn more about each type.

Every state has different adoption laws, but the goal is always to provide safe and stable homes for children. In Washington, the laws are liberal: anyone can be adopted and anyone over age 18 can be an adoptive parent.

There are three legal phases of an adoption:

  1. The first phase is terminating the legal relationship between the child and the biological parents. Sometimes the biological parent consents to this step, and other times a court terminates parental rights.
  2. The second phase is transferring custody to the adoptive parents. Sometimes the first and second phases happen together, and sometimes they do not.
  3. The third phase is finalizing the adoption. Finalization usually happens weeks or months after the adoptive parents take custody.

A number of laws can affect adoptions, including the Interstate Compact on Placement of Children (ICPC), the federal and state Indian Child Welfare Act, 25 U.S.C. § 1901, the federal and state Servicemembers’ Civil Relief Act, criminal laws prohibiting the purchase and sale of children, and local court rules.

Adoptive parents and adoptees may be eligible for benefits or assistance, depending on the type of adoption. For example, state and federal funds are available for children who meet the definition of a “special needs child,” and the adoption tax credit may be available to people who adopt internationally, domestically, or from foster care.

Our FAQ page answers some of our clients’ most common questions.

Contact Us

Learn more about the different types of adoption.

There are five major types of adoptions: Independent or Private Adoption, Domestic Agency Adoption, International Adoption, Stepparent and Second Parent Adoption, and Adult Adoption. Follow the links to learn more about each type.

Every state has different adoption laws, but the goal is always to provide safe and stable homes for children. In Washington, the laws are liberal: anyone can be adopted and anyone over age 18 can be an adoptive parent.

There are three legal phases of an adoption:

  1. The first phase is terminating the legal relationship between the child and the biological parents. Sometimes the biological parent consents to this step, and other times a court terminates parental rights.
  2. The second phase is transferring custody to the adoptive parents. Sometimes the first and second phases happen together, and sometimes they do not.
  3. The third phase is finalizing the adoption. Finalization usually happens weeks or months after the adoptive parents take custody.

A number of laws can affect adoptions, including the Interstate Compact on Placement of Children (ICPC), the federal and state Indian Child Welfare Act, 25 U.S.C. § 1901, the federal and state Servicemembers’ Civil Relief Act, criminal laws prohibiting the purchase and sale of children, and local court rules.

Adoptive parents and adoptees may be eligible for benefits or assistance, depending on the type of adoption. For example, state and federal funds are available for children who meet the definition of a “special needs child,” and the adoption tax credit may be available to people who adopt internationally, domestically, or from foster care.

Our FAQ page answers some of our clients’ most common questions.

Contact Us