FOR BIRTH PARENTS

FOR BIRTH PARENTS

If you are considering whether adoption is the right choice for you and your baby, please contact us by phone, email, or text or check out the FAQs below.

Our office serves as an adoption resource for expectant parents. We are happy to travel to meet with you.

All potential adoptive parents must be screened by a court-approved social worker to ensure they are able to provide a good home for a child, but you may want to know even more than that. You can choose adoptive parents who have other children or are childless, who practice a certain religion or none at all, who live in a particular town or state, or who play the ukulele and have a pet iguana. You are deciding who should parent your child and should have every question answered and all the information you need to make an informed, loving choice.

You also have the right to decide if you would like to make an open or a confidential adoption plan. We can arrange for you to receive medical care if you are not already seeing a doctor, and some living expenses may also be available, within the boundaries of state law. If you are interested in talking to someone about your adoption plan, either before birth or after your child is placed, we can also make counseling services available.

We will never try to talk you into making an adoption plan for your baby if you are undecided. Our goal is to make sure you have access to resources and support so you will feel confident about your decision, regardless of what you decide.

Here are some answers to questions we frequently hear from expectant parents who are considering making an adoption plan for their child. If you have additional questions or want to learn more about us, please contact us.

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Yes! Maybe you’d like your child to be raised in a particular town, practice a certain religion, have siblings, grow up going to Mariners games or camping, be exposed to the arts, or physically resemble his or her adoptive family. Or maybe you just want to know that your child will be safe and happy and loved.

There are adopting parents ready and waiting to provide whatever sort of future you envision for your child. We can help, but the choice is entirely yours.

Before they are allowed to adopt, prospective adoptive parents must be approved by a court-appointed social worker. The social worker interviews them, gathers medical and financial information, runs background checks, and prepares a thorough report for the court.

Usually, adoptive parents want to know anything and everything that you are willing to share. Most are curious about your background–how and where you were raised, what you like to do for fun, your interests, and things you dislike. Knowing your family health history will help them (and eventually, your child) with medical care. More than anything, adoptive parents want to know what you want for your baby.

No. The legal, medical, and pregnancy counseling costs associated with an adoption are almost always paid by the adoptive parents. Making an adoption plan will not cost you anything.

Possibly. In most cases, adoptive parents are allowed to pay certain costs related to the pregnancy, including some living expenses. Because it is illegal to “buy” or “sell” a child, the rules for payment of living expenses are strict. The agency or attorney handling the adoption will be able to explain what costs might be covered in your situation.

Under Washington law, you can change your mind about the adoption plan any time, for any reason, or for no reason at all, until the court signs an order approving your consent to the adoption and terminating your parental rights. The court cannot sign that order until at least 48 hours after the baby is born or after you have signed the consent, whichever is later.

If you do change your mind about the adoption, you have no obligation to repay any living expenses the adoptive parents might have paid on your behalf.

After the court signs the order terminating your parental rights, you cannot revoke your consent unless there was fraud or duress.

This depends on which state’s law will apply to the adoption, and it is an issue you should discuss sooner rather than later with the attorney or agency handling the adoption.

Depending on which state’s law applies, there is a legal process for terminating the parental rights of fathers whose identity or whereabouts are unknown. Again, you should bring this up as early in the process as possible with the attorney or agency.

The ethical rules governing lawyers prohibit the attorney representing the adoptive parents from also representing you. It is always better for birth parents to consult with their own lawyer, and that lawyer’s fees will be paid by the adoptive parents. No one can force you to talk to a lawyer if you don’t want to, however. Although we do not recommend it, it is not unusual for biological parents to go through the adoption process without separate representation.

You might have heard the term “open adoption,” which refers to the amount of contact between the birth parents, you, and your child after the adoption. Washington allows parties to enter “open adoption agreements” describing the nature and frequency of contact between you and the child while the child is under the age of 18.

Usually, open adoption agreements provide for some combination of written updates and sharing photos, and sometimes the parties will agree to visits. Open adoption agreements are not required, but they are extremely useful tools for setting expectations.

Whatever you want to happen. The hospital’s job is to make sure your wishes are honored. If you would like to keep the baby in your room or feed her, you can do that. If you would prefer that the baby stay in the nursery or with the adoptive parents, you can do that, too. You will complete a birth plan ahead of time so the hospital (especially its social workers) will know in advance that you have made an adoption plan for your child.

If you are considering whether adoption is the right choice for you and your baby, please contact us by phone, email, or text or check out the FAQs below.

Our office serves as an adoption resource for expectant parents. We are happy to travel to meet with you.

All potential adoptive parents must be screened by a court-approved social worker to ensure they are able to provide a good home for a child, but you may want to know even more than that. You can choose adoptive parents who have other children or are childless, who practice a certain religion or none at all, who live in a particular town or state, or who play the ukulele and have a pet iguana. You are deciding who should parent your child and should have every question answered and all the information you need to make an informed, loving choice.

You also have the right to decide if you would like to make an open or a confidential adoption plan. We can arrange for you to receive medical care if you are not already seeing a doctor, and some living expenses may also be available, within the boundaries of state law. If you are interested in talking to someone about your adoption plan, either before birth or after your child is placed, we can also make counseling services available.

We will never try to talk you into making an adoption plan for your baby if you are undecided. Our goal is to make sure you have access to resources and support so you will feel confident about your decision, regardless of what you decide.

Here are some answers to questions we frequently hear from expectant parents who are considering making an adoption plan for their child. If you have additional questions or want to learn more about us, please contact us.

Contact Us

Yes! Maybe you’d like your child to be raised in a particular town, practice a certain religion, have siblings, grow up going to Mariners games or camping, be exposed to the arts, or physically resemble his or her adoptive family. Or maybe you just want to know that your child will be safe and happy and loved.

There are adopting parents ready and waiting to provide whatever sort of future you envision for your child. We can help, but the choice is entirely yours.

Before they are allowed to adopt, prospective adoptive parents must be approved by a court-appointed social worker. The social worker interviews them, gathers medical and financial information, runs background checks, and prepares a thorough report for the court.

Usually, adoptive parents want to know anything and everything that you are willing to share. Most are curious about your background–how and where you were raised, what you like to do for fun, your interests, and things you dislike. Knowing your family health history will help them (and eventually, your child) with medical care. More than anything, adoptive parents want to know what you want for your baby.

No. The legal, medical, and pregnancy counseling costs associated with an adoption are almost always paid by the adoptive parents. Making an adoption plan will not cost you anything.

Possibly. In most cases, adoptive parents are allowed to pay certain costs related to the pregnancy, including some living expenses. Because it is illegal to “buy” or “sell” a child, the rules for payment of living expenses are strict. The agency or attorney handling the adoption will be able to explain what costs might be covered in your situation.

Under Washington law, you can change your mind about the adoption plan any time, for any reason, or for no reason at all, until the court signs an order approving your consent to the adoption and terminating your parental rights. The court cannot sign that order until at least 48 hours after the baby is born or after you have signed the consent, whichever is later.

If you do change your mind about the adoption, you have no obligation to repay any living expenses the adoptive parents might have paid on your behalf.

After the court signs the order terminating your parental rights, you cannot revoke your consent unless there was fraud or duress.

This depends on which state’s law will apply to the adoption, and it is an issue you should discuss sooner rather than later with the attorney or agency handling the adoption.

Depending on which state’s law applies, there is a legal process for terminating the parental rights of fathers whose identity or whereabouts are unknown. Again, you should bring this up as early in the process as possible with the attorney or agency.

The ethical rules governing lawyers prohibit the attorney representing the adoptive parents from also representing you. It is always better for birth parents to consult with their own lawyer, and that lawyer’s fees will be paid by the adoptive parents. No one can force you to talk to a lawyer if you don’t want to, however. Although we do not recommend it, it is not unusual for biological parents to go through the adoption process without separate representation.

You might have heard the term “open adoption,” which refers to the amount of contact between the birth parents, you, and your child after the adoption. Washington allows parties to enter “open adoption agreements” describing the nature and frequency of contact between you and the child while the child is under the age of 18.

Usually, open adoption agreements provide for some combination of written updates and sharing photos, and sometimes the parties will agree to visits. Open adoption agreements are not required, but they are extremely useful tools for setting expectations.

Whatever you want to happen. The hospital’s job is to make sure your wishes are honored. If you would like to keep the baby in your room or feed her, you can do that. If you would prefer that the baby stay in the nursery or with the adoptive parents, you can do that, too. You will complete a birth plan ahead of time so the hospital (especially its social workers) will know in advance that you have made an adoption plan for your child.